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Introduction:

Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure, also known as Fanny Hill is a novel by John Cleland. Written in 1749, it is considered the first erotic novel, and has became a byword for the battle of censorship of erotica. Fanny's story, as she falls into prostitution and then rises to respectability, takes the form of a confession that is coloured by copious and explicit physiological details of her carnal adventures.
During my visit to London for studies where we had an Old Ancestral Home, I stumbled on a family treasure. Apart from other things I also found a hump of books, dairies and notes in the treasure which contained classic, Age old, Erotic books, Novels, and Magazines probably collected by my Ancestors. They are all timeless and precious. They are a must read for all erotica lovers. I am sharing them on this site, Enjoy part 6 of Letter the First

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MEMOIRS OF A Woman of Pleasure.

Letter the First - Part 7

It was then broad day. I was sitting up in the bed, the cloaths of which were all tost, or roll'd off, by the unquietness of our motions, from the sultry heat of the weather; nor could I refuse myself a pleasure that solicited me so irresistibly, as this fair occasion of feasting my sight with all those treasures of youthful beauty I had enjoy'd, and which lay now almost entirely naked, his shirt being trust up in a perfect wisp, which the warmth of the room and season made me easy about the consequence of. I hung over him enamour'd indeed! and devour'd all his naked charms with only two eyes, when I could have wish'd them at least a hundred, for the fuller enjoyment of the gaze.

Oh! could I paint his figure as I see it now still present to my transported imagination! a whole length of an all-perfect, manly beauty in full view. Think of a face without a fault, glowing with all the opening bloom, and vernal freshness of an age, in which beauty is of either sex, and which the first down over his upper-lip scarce began to distinguish.

The parting of the double ruby-pout of his lips, seem'd to exhale an air sweeter and purer than what it drew in: Ah! what violence did it not cost me to refrain the so tempted kiss!

Then a neck exquisitely turn'd, grac'd behind and on the sides with his hair, playing freely in natural ringlets, connected his head to a body of the most perfect form, and of the most vigorous contexture, in which all the strength of manhood was conceal'd and soften'd to appearance, by the delicacy of his complexion, the smoothness of his skin, and the plumpness of his flesh.

The plat-form of his snow-white bosom, that was laid out in a manly proportion, presented on the vermilion summit of each pap, the idea of a rose about to blow.

Nor did his shirt hinder me from observing that symmetry of his limbs, that exactness of shape, in the fall of it towards the loins, where the waist ends, and the rounding swell of the hips commences, where the skin, sleek, smooth, and dazzling white, burnishes on the stretch over firm, plump, ripe flesh, that crimped and ran into dimples at the least pressure, or that the touch could not rest upon, but slid over as on the surface of the most polish'd ivory.

His thighs finely fashion'd, and with a florid glossy roundness gradually tapering away to the knees, seem'd pillars worthy to support that beauteous frame, at the bottom of which I could not, without some remains of terrour, some tender emotions too, fix my eyes on that terrible spit-fire machine, which had not long before, with such fury broke into, torn, and almost ruin'd those soft tender parts of mine, which had not yet done smarting with the effects of its rage; but behold it now! crest-fall'n, reclining its half-capt vermillion head over one of his thighs, quiet, pliant, and to all appearance incapable of the mischiefs and cruelty it had committed. Then the beautiful growth of the hair, in short and soft curls round its root, its whiteness, branch'd veins, the supple softness of the shaft, as it lay foreshorten'd, roll'd and shrunk up into a squob thickness, languid, and born up from between the thighs, by its globular appendage, that wondrous treasure bag of nature's sweets, which rivell'd round, and purs'd up in the only wrinkles that are known to please, perfected the prospect; and all together form'd the most interesting moving picture in nature, and surely infinitely superior to those nudities furnish'd by the painters, statuaries, or any art, which are purchas'd at immense prices, whilst the sight of them in actual life is scarce sovereignly tasted by any but the few whom nature has endowed with a fire of imagination, warmly pointed by a truth of judgment to the spring-head, the originals of beauty of nature's unequall'd composition, above all the imitation of art, or the reach of wealth to pay their price.

But every thing must have an end. A motion made by this angelic youth, in the listlessness of going-off sleep, replac'd his shirt and cloaths in a posture that shut up that treasure from longer view.

I lay down then, and carrying my hands to that part of me, in which the objects just seen had begun to raise a mutiny, that prevail'd over the smart of them, my fingers now open'd themselves an easy passage; but long I had not time to consider the wide difference there, between the maid, and the now finish'd woman, before Charles wak'd, and turning towards me, kindly enquir'd how I had rested? and scarce giving me time to answer, imprinted on my lips one of his burning rapture-kisses, which darted a flame to my heart, that from thence radiated to every part of me: and presently, as if he had proudly meant revenge for the survey I had smuggled of all his naked beauties, he spurns off the bed-cloaths, and trussing up my shift as high as it would go, took his turn to feast his eyes with all the gifts nature had bestow'd on my person; his busy hands too rang'd intemperantly over every part of me. The delicious austerity, and hardness of my yet unripe budding breasts, the whiteness and firmness of my flesh, the freshness and regularity of my features, the harmony of my limbs, all seem'd to confirm him in his satisfaction with his bargain: but, when curious to explore the havoc he had made in the tender center of his over-fierce attack, he not only directed his hands there, but with a pillow put under, placed me favourably for his wanton purpose of inspection; then, who can express the fire his eyes glisten'd, his hands glow'd with? whilst sighs of pleasure, and tender broken exclamations were all the praises he could utter. By this time, his machine stiffly risen at me, lifted and bore the flap of his shirt out, which presently fiercely removing, gave me to see it in its highest state and bravery: He feels it himself, seems pleas'd at its condition, and, smiling loves and graces, seizes one of my hands, and carries it, with a gentle compulsion, to this pride of nature, and its richest master-piece.

I struggling faintly, could not help feeling what I could not grasp, a column of the whitest ivory, beautifully streak'd with blue veins, and carrying, fully uncapt, a head of the liveliest vermillion: no horn could be harder, or stiffer; yet no velvet more smooth or delicious to the touch; presently he guided my hand lower, to that part, in which nature and pleasure keep their stores in concert, so aptly fasten'd and hung on to the root of their first instrument and minister, that not improperly he might be stil'd their purse-bearer too: there he made me feel, distinctly, through their soft cover, the contents, a pair of roundish balls, that seem'd to play within, and elude all pressure, but the tenderest, from without.

But now this visit of my soft warm hand, in those so sensible parts, had put every thing into such ungovernable fury, that disdaining all further preluding, and taking the advantage of my commodious posture, he made the storm fall where I scarce patiently expected, and where he was sure to lay it: presently then l felt the stiff intersertion between the yielding divided lips of the wound now open for life; where the narrowness no longer put me to intollerable pain, and afforded my lover no more difficulty than what heighten'd his pleasure, in the strict embrace of that tender warm sheath, round the instrument it was so deliciously adjusted to, and which, now cased home, so gorged me with pleasure, that it perfectly suffocated me, and took away my breath: then the killing thrusts! the un-number'd kisses! every one of which was a joy inexpressible! and that joy lost in a crowd of yet greater blisses; but this was a disorder too violent in nature to last long: the vessels so stir'd, and intensely heated, soon boil'd over, and for that time put out the fire: mean while all this dalliance and disport had so far consum'd the morning, that it became a kind of necessity to lay breakfast and dinner into one.

In our calmer intervals Charles gave the following account of himself, every tittle of which was true. He was the only son of a father, who having a small post in the revenue, rather over-liv'd his income, and had given this young gentleman a very slender education: no profession had he bred him up to, but design'd to provide for him in the army, by purchasing him an ensign's commission; that is to say, provided he could raise the money, or procure it by interest, either of which clauses was rather to be wish'd than hop'd for by him: on no better a plan, however, than this, had this improvident father suffer'd this youth, and a youth of great promise, to run up to the age of manhood, or near it at least, in next to idleness, and had besides taken no sort of pains to give him even the common premonitions against the vices of the town, and the dangers of all sorts which wait the unexperienc'd, and unwary, in it. He liv'd at home, and at discretion, with his father, who himself kept a mistress, and for the rest, provided Charles did not ask him for money, he was indolently kind to him: he might lie out when he pleas'd: any excuse would serve, and even his reprimands were so slight, that they carried with them rather an air of connivance at the fault, than any serious controul or constraint. But, to supply his calls for money, Charles, whose mother was dead, had, by her side, a grand mother who doated upon, and did not a little help-spoil him. She had a considerable annuity to live upon, and very regularly parted with every shilling she could spare, to this darling of her's, to the no little heart-burn of his father, who was vex'd, not that she by this means fed his son's extravagance; but that she preferred Charles to himself, and we shall too soon see what a fatal turn such a mercenary jealousy could operate on the breast of a father.

Charles was however, by the means of his grand-mother's lavish fondness, very sufficiently enabl'd to keep a mistress so easily contented as my love made me; and my good fortune, for such I must ever call it, threw me in his way, in the manner above related, just as he was on the look-out for one.

As to his temper, the even sweetness of it made him seem born for domestic happiness: tender, naturally polite, and gentle-manner'd; it could never be his fault, if ever jars, or animosities ruffled a calm he was so qualify'd every way to maintain or restore. Without those great or shining qualities that constitute a genius, or are fit to make a noise in the world, he had all those humble ones that compose the softer social merit: plain common sense, set off with every grace of modesty and good-nature, made him, if not admir'd, what is much happier, universally belov'd and esteem'd. But, as nothing, but the beauties of his person had at first attracted my regard, and fix'd my passion, neither was I then a judge of that internal merit, which I had afterward full occasion to discover, and which perhaps, in that season of giddiness and levity, would have touch'd my heart very little, had it been lodg'd in a person less the delight of my eyes, and idol of my senses. But to return to our situation.—

Aster dinner, which we eat a-bed in a most voluptuous disorder, Charles got up, and taking a passionate leave of me for a few hours, he went to town, where concerting matters with a young sharp lawyer, they went together to my late venerable mistress's, from whence I had but the day before made my elopement, and with whom he was determin'd to settle accounts in a manner that should cut off all after-reckonings from that quarter.

Accordingly, they went; but by the way, the Templar, his friend, on thinking over Charles's information, saw reason to give their visit another turn, and instead of offering satisfaction, to demand it.

On being let in, the girls of the house flock'd round Charles, whom they knew, and from the earliness of my escape, and their perfect ignorance of his ever having so much as seen me, not having the least suspicion of his being accessary to my flight, they were, in their way, making up to him; and as to his companion, they took him probably for a fresh cully: but the Templar soon check'd their forwardness by enquiring for the old lady, with whom he said, with a grave judge-like countenance, that he had some business to settle.

Madam was immediately sent for down, and the ladies being desir'd to clear the room, the lawyer ask'd her severely if she did not know, or had not decoy'd, under pretence of hiring as a servant, a young girl, just come out of the country, called Frances or Fanny Hill, describing me withall as particularly as he could from Charles's de***********ion.

It is peculiar to vice to tremble at the enquiries of justice: and Mrs. Brown, whose conscience was not entirely clear upon my account, as knowing as she was of the town, as hackney'd as she was in buffing through all the dangers of her vocation, could not help being alarm'd at the question, especially when he went on to talk of a Justice of Peace, Newgate, the Old Baily, Indictments for keeping a disorderly house, Pillory, Carting, and the whole process of that nature: She who, it is likely, imagin'd I had lodg'd an information against her house, look'd extremely blank, and began to make a thousand protestations, and excuses. However, to abridge, they brought away triumphantly my box of things, which had she not been under an awe, she might have disputed with them; and not only that, but a clearance and discharge of any demands on the house, at the expence of no more than a bowl of arrack-punch, the treat of which, together with the choice of the house-conveniencies, was offer'd, and not accepted. Charles all the time acted the chance-companion of the lawyer who had brought him there, as he knew the house, and appear'd in no wise interested in the issue, but he had the collateral pleasure of hearing all I had told him verified, so far as the bawd's fears would give her leave to enter into my history, which, if one may guess by the composition she so readily came into, not small.

Continued. to part 8

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Notes;

1. During my visit to London for studies where we had an Old Ancestral Home, I stumbled on a family treasure. Apart from other things I also found a hump of books, diaries, and notes in the treasure which contained classic, Age-old, Erotic books, Novels, and Magazines probably collected by my Ancestors. They are all timeless and precious. They are a must-read for all erotica lovers.

2. The Original Authors of most of these Stories/Letters or Articles are long dead or Anonymous.

3. Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure—popularly known as Fanny Hill is an erotic novel by English novelist John Cleland first published in London in 1748. Written while the author was in debtors' prison in London, it is considered "the first original English prose pornography, and the first pornography to use the form of the novel". It is one of the most prosecuted and banned books in history.

The book exemplifies the use of euphemism. The text has no "dirty words" or explicit scientific terms for body parts, but uses many literary devices to describe genitalia. For example, the vagina is sometimes referred to as "the nethermouth", which is also an example of psychological displacement.
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